Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist - You must take the time to watch this music video! It shows the modern mixologist as... well... you decide how you take it... I take my craft VERY seriously, I'm sure you do too...The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do... My take is... 'guest satisfaction'... Not pomp and circumstance. An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic! Let's not all take ourselves too seriously. I'm a bartender, right? What'll you have Mixology or Mixologist By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing. Merriam-Webster's dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as: "the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks" Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it's use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn't necessarily so. Neither is "better" than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged. A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending. Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you're just as free to do so. Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book) Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Old School Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

Old School Old Fashioned
  • Begin with a nice peel of orange, and one peel of lemon, at the bottom of your serving glass.
  • On top of that add one packet of 'sugar in the raw.
  • Add 'three' shakes of Angostura bitters.
  • Add 'two' bar spoonfuls of water, to help dissolve the sugar and soften the whiskey.
  • Muddled these ingredients together. Releasing the citrus oils.
  • Add Ice to top of serving glass
  • Add 'two' ounces Bourbon Whiskey
  • Stir to incorporate flavors
  • Add 'one' nice orange peel twist on top for garnish.
  • Serve and enjoy!
The Old-fashioned is a classic whiskey drink that has been served since around 1880 at the Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky and is (disputably) the first drink referred to as a cocktail. It is the perfect ideal of what a cocktail should contain: a spirit, a sweet, a bitter, and water. There is also a dispute as to use rye or bourbon, sometimes brandy and never rum. Depends on where you come from and what you like. I like bourbon, you can use anything you like.  

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist - You must take the time to watch this music video! It shows the modern mixologist as... well... you decide how you take it... I take my craft VERY seriously, I'm sure you do too...The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do... My take is... 'guest satisfaction'... Not pomp and circumstance. An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic! Let's not all take ourselves too seriously. I'm a bartender, right? What'll you have Mixology or Mixologist By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing. Merriam-Webster's dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as: "the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks" Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it's use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn't necessarily so. Neither is "better" than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged. A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending. Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you're just as free to do so. Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book) Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video - Following is our collection of DRINK RECIPE HD VIDEOs, starring The Drink Chef and demonstrating today’s most popular and elusive cocktails. He shows you exactly how he makes his version of these drinks. Drink Recipes Video Collection Honoring the traditions of the proud bartending world. Watch Blake here, clearly explaining how to properly create ‘craft cocktails’. Over one hundred ‘step by step’ instructional videos, filmed in HD, and brought to you here. These are not the only way to make drinks, nor are they the definitive answer to cocktail recipes, this a helpful collection of ‘how to’ videos, in a real world bartending scenario, using the actual tools, tricks, techniques and practices of a modern day bartender.

Sidecar

Sidecar Cocktail

• 2 ounce Premium Cognac or Brandy • ¾ ounce Tripe Sec • ¾ ounce Fresh Lemon Juice • ¾ ounce Simple Syrup • Shake and Strain Into a Chilled Cocktail Glass • Garnish With A Fresh Lemon Twist • Also Perhaps Some Brandy Soaked Cherries The Sidecar Cocktail - It is said that this classic old school cocktail was named after the motorcycle sidecar that chauffeured an American Army captain, to and from his favorite Parisian bistro, during the first world war. The first mention of this drink in a recipe book was three years after the war in 1922. In a book called Harry's ABC of Mixing Cocktails, by Harry MacElhone. This drink features brandy, orange liqueur and fresh lemon juice, shaken and served in a chilled and sugar rimmed martini glass. Cheers!

Chili Pineapple Margarita

Chili Pineapple Margarita

• Begin With 1 Slice of Fresh Jalapeno • 3 Wedges of Lime • And 1 Chili Pepper, Muddle These • At The Bottom of a Mixing Glass • 1 1/4 ounce Premium Tequila • ¾ ounce Triple Sec • 2 ounce Homemade Sweet & Sour • Shake and Pour into a Salt Rimmed Highball Glass • Garnish with a Strawberry and a Slice of Jalapeno Chili Pineapple Margarita - is a Drink Chef signature cocktail. It's a little sweet, a little spicy and quite delicious! Put it on your menu and watch it grow... A huge house favorite! Savory, sweet AND spicy! Not for everyone, this is quite unique and enticing to many, many of my guests. Give it a try this weekend! The cilantro kosher salt is also a great addition. Just put kosher salt in a food processor an a small bunch of cilantro leaves, blend them up and rim your glass! Cheers!

Bronx Cocktail

Bronx Cocktail

• 3 ounce Premium Gin • ½ ounce Dry Vermouth • ½ ounce Sweet Vermouth • 1 ounce Fresh Orange Juice • ¾ ounce Simple Syrup • Shake and Pour into Chilled Cocktail Glass • Garnish with a Wedge of Orange The Bronx Cocktail is essentially a Perfect Martini with orange juice added. It was ranked number three in "The World's 10 Most Famous Cocktails in 1934". An old school classic, it was the third most popular cocktail in 1934, after the martini and the Manhattan. Today, it remains a popular choice in some markets, and is designated as an Official Cocktail by the International Bartender Association. Like the Manhattan, the Bronx is one of five cocktails named for one of New York City's five boroughs, but is perhaps most closely related to the Queens, which substitutes pineapple for the Bronx's orange. Two gentlemen of the era are separately credited as this drinks originators. Joe Sormani, from Philly and Johnnie Solon of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. Whoever was the true author, this drink has fallen into obscurity, but isn't out of the game completely. Gin, Dry Vermouth, Sweet Vermouth and Orange Juice, makes this a tasty drink.

The Envelope Bar Trick

Dear John

Dear John

The Envelope Bar Trick - This is a video of Blake, The Drink Chef, showing a bar trick involving an envelope and a story about it. It's just a silly little bar trick, but the restaurant business IS the entertainment business. This trick is good  entertainment. Just pick your audience carefully and have at it! Have fun! Cheers!

Australian Tea Bag Rocket Ship Bar Trick

This is a picture of Blake doing the Australian Tea Bag Rocket Ship Bar Trick

Blake Down Undah!

Australian Tea Bag Rocket Ship Bar Trick - This is a great bar trick that I learned a long time ago, from a true Aussie, from down undah. The example here is out of context of a happening bar scene, but if you stop to imagine a full bar and drunk people. It's dark, it's busy and it's FUN! Be sure to practice this before you attempt it in public, and test out the tea bags you intend to use... they don't all work the same. Also... if you have one of your co-workers kill the lights right when you light the tea bag... the effect is amplified greatly. Your surface must be perfectly dry, and there must be 'no wind'. All these things will kill this trick. But if you pull it off once, you will thank me. Cheers Mate!

Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

  • Old Fashioned
  • Two Peels of Citrus,
  • One Packet of Sugar,
  • Two Spoons of Water and
  • 3 Shakes of Angostura Bitters,
  • Muddle, then Add ice
  • 2 ounces Whiskey, Garnish with an Orange Peel.
Cocktail is a very misunderstood drink nowadays. The Old Fashioned is a cocktail made by muddling dissolved sugar with bitters then adding alcohol, such as jenever, whiskey or brandy, but usually whiskey, and a twist of citrus rind. The name references the combination's age: it is possibly the first drink to be called a cocktail. It is traditionally served in a short, round glass called an Old Fashioned glass, named after the drink. There is great contention on the proper way to make an Old Fashioned. The apparently earliest written recipe, from 1895, specifies the following: "Dissolve a small lump of sugar with a little water in a whiskey-glass; add two dashes Angostura bitters, a small piece of ice, a piece of lemon-peel, one jigger whiskey. Mix with small bar-spoon and serve, leaving spoon in glass. This is the 'old school' preparation, however the more modern and contemporary preparation has the preparer muddle a slice of orange and a maraschino cherry with bitters, then add whiskey and ice. So... when your guest orders this cocktail, you should ask them, 'Would you like the traditional 'old school' version or the more modern 'contemporary' style. By communicating this to your guest... then you will show them they are in good hands. The first use of the specific name "Old Fashioned" was for a Bourbon whiskey cocktail in the 1880s, at the Pendennis Club, a gentleman’s club in Louisville, Kentucky. The recipe is said to have been invented by a bartender at that club, and popularized by a club member and bourbon distiller, Colonel James E. Pepper. The apparently earliest written recipe, from 1895, specifies the following: Dissolve a small lump of sugar with a little water in a whiskey-glass; add two dashes Angostura bitters, a small piece ice, a piece lemon-peel, one jigger or 1.5 ounces whiskey. Mix with small bar-spoon and serve, leaving spoon in glass. My version is decidedly different and not necessarily ‘classic’. Shown in my video is what the modern drinker ‘expects’ in a good ‘old fashioned’. THIS IS NOT THE END ALL RECIPE, it’s just a very tasty drink that has evolved for 130 years. Cheers! BUY MY BOOK = http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0974505943/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link The Drink Chef = http://thedrinkchef.com Connect with me on Facebook = http://facebook.com/thedrinkchef Follow me on Twitter = http://twitter.com/thedrinkchef Web Design by 3Plus = http://wordpress3plus.com