Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist - You must take the time to watch this music video! It shows the modern mixologist as... well... you decide how you take it... I take my craft VERY seriously, I'm sure you do too...The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do... My take is... 'guest satisfaction'... Not pomp and circumstance. An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic! Let's not all take ourselves too seriously. I'm a bartender, right? What'll you have Mixology or Mixologist By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing. Merriam-Webster's dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as: "the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks" Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it's use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn't necessarily so. Neither is "better" than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged. A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending. Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you're just as free to do so. Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book) Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Old School Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

Old Fashioned

Old School Old Fashioned
  • Begin with a nice peel of orange, and one peel of lemon, at the bottom of your serving glass.
  • On top of that add one packet of 'sugar in the raw.
  • Add 'three' shakes of Angostura bitters.
  • Add 'two' bar spoonfuls of water, to help dissolve the sugar and soften the whiskey.
  • Muddled these ingredients together. Releasing the citrus oils.
  • Add Ice to top of serving glass
  • Add 'two' ounces Bourbon Whiskey
  • Stir to incorporate flavors
  • Add 'one' nice orange peel twist on top for garnish.
  • Serve and enjoy!
The Old-fashioned is a classic whiskey drink that has been served since around 1880 at the Pendennis Club in Louisville, Kentucky and is (disputably) the first drink referred to as a cocktail. It is the perfect ideal of what a cocktail should contain: a spirit, a sweet, a bitter, and water. There is also a dispute as to use rye or bourbon, sometimes brandy and never rum. Depends on where you come from and what you like. I like bourbon, you can use anything you like.  

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist - You must take the time to watch this music video! It shows the modern mixologist as... well... you decide how you take it... I take my craft VERY seriously, I'm sure you do too...The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do... My take is... 'guest satisfaction'... Not pomp and circumstance. An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic! Let's not all take ourselves too seriously. I'm a bartender, right? What'll you have Mixology or Mixologist By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing. Merriam-Webster's dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as: "the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks" Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it's use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn't necessarily so. Neither is "better" than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged. A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending. Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you're just as free to do so. Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book) Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Bartop Garnish Array Video Tour

This is a VIDEO TOUR and PHOTO GALLERY of a high end bar's GARNISH and FRESH FRUIT SETUP for a busy Friday night's business. A true gourmet 'craft' bartender set up, offering herbs and spices, berries & fruits and lots of glass rimmer choices. Please keep in mind that the collective impression of all of these products together, in one place, at one time, displayed for all to see... leaves a lingering impression on your guest. It shows your guest that you care. This set up tells a story... a story that has yet to be written, but is a bounty of flavorful opportunity. I harvested these fresh products from our 'cocktail garden' devoted just to our bar. Lovingly tended to by Geri Miller of www.HomeGrownEdibleLandscapes.com. Click any thumbnail to view the GALLERY SLIDESHOW: Sorry for the low quality of the video and the audio! I have another video shoot planned and will redo this one soon! I will mention here that what is not spoken about or showed is fresh 'Lavender'. This flowering plant offers any cocktail a nuance that is like no other. The light purple flower is the perfect garnish and the aromomatic leaves are the perfect accent for many a drink. Give it a try! I've had comments on how 'modern mixologists' don't cut their fruit ahead of time. Well, I agree with this principle, in theory. It is always best to have the absolute freshest possible product. However... at the establishment where this is filmed, the whole restaurant and the bar relied on me to get the drinks out in a timely fashion. There is no bar back, no bartender partner, no manager stepping in to help. Just one bartender, that needs to be set up and ready for anything. The purpose of this video is to show any bartender, that there is an array of products to 'display', in your own bar, that you probably already have in house. Go look in the walk in and see what you can find. Show it off, and your guests will feel like this bar really cares about fresh fruits, berries, herbs and spices in their bar program. Cheers! From the Drink Chef... Bar Garnish Set Up for the Craft Bartender The Bartop Garnish Set Up