mrmixologist

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist – You must take the time to watch this music video!
It shows the modern mixologist as… well… you decide how you take it…
I take my craft VERY seriously, I’m sure you do too…The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do…
My take is… ‘guest satisfaction’… Not pomp and circumstance.

An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic!
Let’s not all take ourselves too seriously.
I’m a bartender, right? What’ll you have
Mixology or Mixologist
By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide

Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing.
Merriam-Webster’s dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as:
“the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks”
Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it’s use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn’t necessarily so. Neither is “better” than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged.
A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending.
Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you’re just as free to do so.
Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book)
Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist – You must take the time to watch this music video!
It shows the modern mixologist as… well… you decide how you take it…
I take my craft VERY seriously, I’m sure you do too…The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do…
My take is… ‘guest satisfaction’… Not pomp and circumstance.

An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic!
Let’s not all take ourselves too seriously.
I’m a bartender, right? What’ll you have
Mixology or Mixologist
By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide

Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing.
Merriam-Webster’s dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as:
“the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks”
Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it’s use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn’t necessarily so. Neither is “better” than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged.
A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending.
Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you’re just as free to do so.
Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book)
Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video – Following is our collection of DRINK RECIPE HD VIDEOs, starring The Drink Chef and demonstrating today’s most popular and elusive cocktails. He shows you exactly how he makes his version of these drinks.

Drink Recipes Video Collection

Honoring the traditions of the proud bartending world. Watch Blake here, clearly explaining how to properly create ‘craft cocktails’. Over one hundred ‘step by step’ instructional videos, filmed in HD, and brought to you here. These are not the only way to make drinks, nor are they the definitive answer to cocktail recipes, this a helpful collection of ‘how to’ videos, in a real world bartending scenario, using the actual tools, tricks, techniques and practices of a modern day bartender.

Alabama Slammer

Alabama Slammer

  • Alabama Slammer
  • In a Highball Serving Glass full of ice
  • ½  ounce Southern Comfort Liqueur
  • ½  ounce Amaretto
  • ½  ounce Sloe Gin
  • 2 ounce Orange Juice
  • Orange Wedge Garnish

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This is the perfect springtime cocktail. The Alabama Slammer is made with Amaretto, Southern Comfort & Sloe Gin, with a little Orange Juice to top it off. It the Southern version of a Long Island Iced Tea. It’s a delicious and refreshing cocktail that can be enjoyed all afternoon long. Cheers!

Mai Tai

Mai Tai

  • Mai Tai
  • Build this drink directly into the bucket serving glass full of ice*.
  • *Crushed Ice is Best
  • 1 oz. Light Rum
  • 1 oz. Fresh lime Juice
  • 1 oz. Simple Syrup,
  • 1 oz. Orgeat Syrup (Crème de Almond),
  • 1 oz. Orange Curacoa
  • 1 oz. Dark Rum
  • Garnish with a wedge of pineapple and a cherry

 

 

Check out my bartending and beverage Books
Yes, we have bartender Gear and bartender Training
When is Your Next Party?
What about beverage business? Management Services and Consulting
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The Mai Tai became popular in the early Nineteen Forties, in Oakland, California, at a place called Trader Vic’s in about 1944. There… a visionary named Victor Bergron, one of the founders of this hotspot tiki bar, concocted this great drink that still holds aclaim today! But… Trader Vic’s rival, Don the Beachcomber, claimed to have created it in 1933 at his bar and restaurant in Hollywood. Don the Beachcomber’s recipe is more complex than that of Vic and is a completely different experience.

Mai Tai translates from Tahitian to mean “Very Good” or “Out of this World.” A fitting description for this cocktail. Over the years the recipe has changed greatly. Shown for you here today is the basic version of this entrenched classic. Cheers!

The Envelope Bar Trick

Dear John

Dear John

The Envelope Bar Trick – This is a video of Blake, The Drink Chef, showing a bar trick involving an envelope and a story about it. It’s just a silly little bar trick, but the restaurant business IS the entertainment business. This trick is good  entertainment. Just pick your audience carefully and have at it! Have fun! Cheers!

Negroni

Negroni Cocktail


The Negroni
• Begin With a Mixing Glass Full of Ice.
• 1 ounce Premium Gin
• 1 ounce Campari
• 1 ounce Sweet Vermouth
• Stir 30 to 50 Times
• Strain into a Chilled Cocktail Glass
• Garnish with an Orange Peel

The Negroni cocktail is made of one part gin, one part sweet vermouth and one part bitters, traditionally Campari. The most widely reported account of it’s origin, is that it was invented in Florence, Italy in 1919, at Caffè Casoni, which is now called Caffè Cavalli. Count Camillo Negroni invented it by asking the bartender, Fosco Scarselli, to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by adding gin rather than the normal soda water. The bartender also added an orange garnish rather than the typical lemon garnish of the Americano to signify that it was a different drink. One of the earliest reports of the drink came from Orson Welles in correspondence with the Coshocton Tribune while working in Rome on Cagliostro in 1947, where he described a new drink called the Negroni.

Sazerac

Sazarac Cocktail

  • Sazerac Cocktail
  • 1 Small Splash of Absinthe in a Chilled Bucket Serving Glass
  • In a Mixing Glass Full of Ice
  • 2 ounce Rye Whiskey
  • 3/4 oz Simple Syrup
  • 3 Shake Peychaud’s Bitters
  • Serve in a Chilled Bucket Glass Laced With Absinthe
  • Orange Peel Garnish

The Sazerac is a local New Orleans variation of an old-fashioned cognac or whiskey cocktail, named for the Sazerac de Forge et Fils brand of cognac that was its original prime ingredient. The drink is some combination of cognac or rye whiskey, absinthe or Herbsaint, and Peychaud’s Bitters. It is sometimes referred to as the oldest known American cocktail, with origins  prior to the Civil War. The defining feature of the Sazerac is the preparation using Peychaud’s Bitters and two chilled old-fashioned glasses, one swirled with a light wash of absinthe for the slight taste and strong scent. The second chilled glass is used to mix the other ingredients, then the contents of that are poured or strained into the first. Various anisettes such as Pastis, Pernod, Ricard and Herbsaint are common substitutes for absinthe when it is not available, in New Orleans Herbsaint is most commonly used.

Around 1850, Sewell T. Taylor sold his bar, The Merchants Exchange Coffee House, and went into the imported liquor business. He began to import a brand of cognac named Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils. At the same time, Aaron Bird took over the Merchants Exchange and changed its name to the Sazerac House and began serving the “Sazerac Cocktail”, made with Taylor’s Sazerac cognac and, legend has it, the bitters being made down the street by a local druggist, Antoine Amedie Peychaud. The Sazerac House changed hands several times and around 1870 Thomas Handy took over as proprietor. Around this time the primary ingredient changed from cognac to rye whiskey due to the phylloxera epidemic in Europe that devastated France’s wine grape crops. At some point before his death in 1889, Handy recorded the recipe for the cocktail, and the drink made its first printed appearance in William T. “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s 1908 The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them.

Peychaud’s Bitters, originally created around 1830 by Antoine Amédée Peychaud, a Creole apothecary from the French colony of Saint-Domingue, now Haiti, who settled in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1795.

Cantaloupe Coolers

Canteloupe Coolers With Fresh Cilantro

Canteloupe Coolers With Fresh Cilantro


Cantaloupe Coolers
1 1/2 oz. Vodka
1 oz. Marie Brizzard Watermelon Liqueur
1 oz. Fresh orange Juice
1 oz. Fresh Cantaloupe Puree
Shake and Strain into a Cocktail Glass
Sprinkle with some fresh cilantro leaves and some ice cold fresh cantaploupe melon balls. You have yourself a party.
*Trust ME! This is a nice cocktail!