Water-drop-1 mrmixologist

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist – You must take the time to watch this music video!
It shows the modern mixologist as… well… you decide how you take it…
I take my craft VERY seriously, I’m sure you do too…The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do…
My take is… ‘guest satisfaction’… Not pomp and circumstance.

An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic!
Let’s not all take ourselves too seriously.
I’m a bartender, right? What’ll you have
Mixology or Mixologist
By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide

Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing.
Merriam-Webster’s dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as:
“the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks”
Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it’s use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn’t necessarily so. Neither is “better” than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged.
A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending.
Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you’re just as free to do so.
Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book)
Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

15 Worst Things You Could Say To Your Bartender

15 Worst Things You Could Say To Your Bartender

2. “I don’t like the taste of alcohol. I don’t want anything fruity. I don’t like beer. I’m allergic to wine. What do you suggest?”

Water. They sell it by the bottle at the gas station. Go outside, to the left, and keep walking.

3. “Do you have an iPhone 5 charger? Do you have an outlet close to me? Will you plug it in? Can I check it? Can I check it again? Can I check my phone? Did my phone go off? What’s my percentage?”

STOP with the phone babysitting. Bring your own charger if it’s that important. Nobody behind the bar is asking to borrow your shit. Also, meet a hookup old school. In person. Stop it with the dating apps if you’re so worried about wasting your phone’s battery.

4. “Do you know how to make a Monkey Fucker on Acid on the Beach shot?” (Or any other pseudo Cancun, Fort Lauderdale, Vegas, Scottsdale, San Diego Spring Break shot.)

Sure. I can make that. That will be 10 dollars.
Recipe: Crap well spirit, blue schnapps, peach schnapps, pineapple, cranberry.
Every time. Every shot.

5. “Can I get a shot of Jameson?”

Oooh, I like you.

“… Chilled.”

No, I don’t.

6. The following interaction at Last Call:

(Slurring) “Can I get a shot?”
Sure, what would you like? 
(Slurring) “Just make me something!” (Slaps ass of random girl/guy walking by.)

Have you ever heard of a bar mat shot?

7. “Will you ask that single lady over there to sit with me? Or, “Will you send that girl a drink on me?”

Dude, I don’t work at Match.com. Is this your first time in public? Do you even know what year it is? If you want to give her a drink, pick it up and take it over there yourself.

8. “Should I go to Bartending School?”

Not if you want a bartending job.

9. “Can I get a hot tea?”

Of course, would you like any pastries with that?

10. “Oh, Happy Hour? I love it. But first, can I try that wine? And that one? And this one? Oh, and that one also.”

You know you are going to order the $5.00 wine special. Stop pretending.

11. “Can we transfer this check to our table?”

Yes, we love transferring our tips to the servers.

12. (Slurring) “This drink is so weak.”

Wait until you try your next one.

13. “Is this a typical Monday night for you guys? It’s so slow.”

Dude, you are drinking on a Monday night. That’s the point: to avoid the weekend warriors.

14. “I know you guys are closed. You don’t mind that we are still sitting here, do you?”

No, no, it’s no problem. We love standing around for $3.00 dollars an hour in an empty bar, with the lights on and music off, waiting to go home, just so you can make out over melting ice. At this point, the question is begged, why do people just not go home together?

15. “You are seriously the best bartender ever. Service was amazing. Everything was so perfect. Thank you so much. I can’t get over what a great job you did.”

Beware. Beware. The verbal tip. We know your type. Over-complimenting and 10%. We know what you’re up to. And it don’t pay the rent. TC mark

Hey Mr. Mixologist Music Video

Hey Mr Mixologist – You must take the time to watch this music video!
It shows the modern mixologist as… well… you decide how you take it…
I take my craft VERY seriously, I’m sure you do too…The modern mixolgists picutured here, also do what they do…
My take is… ‘guest satisfaction’… Not pomp and circumstance.

An Abosolute, hit it out of the park, classic!
Let’s not all take ourselves too seriously.
I’m a bartender, right? What’ll you have
Mixology or Mixologist
By Colleen Graham, About.com Guide

Definition: Mixology is another term for mixing drinks or bartending and a Mixologist is another term for a bartender or bar chef. Mixology is generally accepted as a slang term for a refined and in depth study of the art and craft of mixing.
Merriam-Webster’s dictionary dates mixology to 1948 and defines it as:
“the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks”
Mixology has become a more common used term in recent years and is generally accepted to be a refined, higher study of mixing cocktails and drinks than the everyday actions of bartender. This definition and it’s use is one of much debate in the bartending community, usually because of the impression it leaves that a mixologist is better and more skilled than a bartender. This isn’t necessarily so. Neither is “better” than the other and each require a different set of skills, but then again the two titles can be interchanged.
A bartender needs to have a variety of skills which are highly important and some that the mixologist may not develop or use on a regular basis. In general a bartender needs to know a lot of common and popular cocktails, serve many people at once, think quick and be the ultimate people person. The mixologist tends to focus on the art and craft of mixing cocktails, studying the classics, concocting new and exotic drinks, experimenting with lesser known distilled spirits and mixers, and, overall, pushing the limits of classic bartending.
Again, these distinctions are the generally accepted differences between the two roles and are meant for clarification. In my view, if you want to be called a bartender, do it and if you want to be known as a mixologist, you’re just as free to do so.
Also Known As: Bar Chef, Cocktailian (Joy of Mixology), Bartender, Bartending, Mixicologist (1895 book)
Original Link: http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailspeak/g/mixology_define.htm

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video

Cocktail Recipes in HD Video – Following is our collection of DRINK RECIPE HD VIDEOs, starring The Drink Chef and demonstrating today’s most popular and elusive cocktails. He shows you exactly how he makes his version of these drinks.

Drink Recipes Video Collection

Honoring the traditions of the proud bartending world. Watch Blake here, clearly explaining how to properly create ‘craft cocktails’. Over one hundred ‘step by step’ instructional videos, filmed in HD, and brought to you here. These are not the only way to make drinks, nor are they the definitive answer to cocktail recipes, this a helpful collection of ‘how to’ videos, in a real world bartending scenario, using the actual tools, tricks, techniques and practices of a modern day bartender.

Sidecar

Sidecar Cocktail

• 2 ounce Premium Cognac or Brandy
• ¾ ounce Tripe Sec
• ¾ ounce Fresh Lemon Juice
• ¾ ounce Simple Syrup
• Shake and Strain Into a Chilled Cocktail Glass
• Garnish With A Fresh Lemon Twist
• Also Perhaps Some Brandy Soaked Cherries

The Sidecar Cocktail – It is said that this classic old school cocktail was named after the motorcycle sidecar that chauffeured an American Army captain, to and from his favorite Parisian bistro, during the first world war. The first mention of this drink in a recipe book was three years after the war in 1922. In a book called Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails, by Harry MacElhone. This drink features brandy, orange liqueur and fresh lemon juice, shaken and served in a chilled and sugar rimmed martini glass. Cheers!

Bronx Cocktail

Bronx Cocktail

• 3 ounce Premium Gin
• ½ ounce Dry Vermouth
• ½ ounce Sweet Vermouth
• 1 ounce Fresh Orange Juice
• ¾ ounce Simple Syrup
• Shake and Pour into Chilled Cocktail Glass
• Garnish with a Wedge of Orange

The Bronx Cocktail is essentially a Perfect Martini with orange juice added. It was ranked number three in “The World’s 10 Most Famous Cocktails in 1934”. An old school classic, it was the third most popular cocktail in 1934, after the martini and the Manhattan. Today, it remains a popular choice in some markets, and is designated as an Official Cocktail by the International Bartender Association. Like the Manhattan, the Bronx is one of five cocktails named for one of New York City’s five boroughs, but is perhaps most closely related to the Queens, which substitutes pineapple for the Bronx’s orange. Two gentlemen of the era are separately credited as this drinks originators. Joe Sormani, from Philly and Johnnie Solon of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. Whoever was the true author, this drink has fallen into obscurity, but isn’t out of the game completely. Gin, Dry Vermouth, Sweet Vermouth and Orange Juice, makes this a tasty drink.

Bar Trick 4 – Olives on a Stick

Ask Me How I Am?… Olive!
Dirty Martini Anyone? This is a little demonstration by Blake, catching olives on a toothpick, held between his teeth. Nice little trick!
Know when to say fun!
I first saw this trick on a VCR video called ‘Olympic Bartending, by professional bartenders, Don Foley & JB Bandy. These guys were very early in my career as a bartending ‘lifer’, a true inspiration.